The One That Got Away

KC Grifant - Lucy Rose - Lydia Prime - Marsheila Rockwell

KC Grifant

How long have you been writing?

Ever since I was able to write in complete sentences, maybe around 3rd grade, I wrote stories. My first tale was about a girl who shrunk down to ride a paper airplane around the classroom. I was so excited and can still remember the wobbly print on the large, lined notepaper. I wrote a series of short stories that year that the teacher read aloud to the class, all with the same ending: “And it was all a dream!”

 

What have been your experiences in the horror community as a woman?

I’ve found the horror community so far to be very welcoming and supportive. I co-founded the Horror Writers Association (HWA) San Diego Chapter a few years ago and that’s been an incredible experience. Fellow horror writers and fans in San Diego are an encouraging and diverse group.

 

2020 left everyone feeling pushed to their limit. How are you finding the creative process this year?

This was a productive year of writing for me. Writing was an escape from the news and world events and a brief respite from worrying about the pandemic. Writing was the only way I felt like I was able to survive this year’s chaos, tragedy and uncertainty without completely losing my mind.

 

We truly believe in intention setting. What is your dream for 2021?

I have a lot of just-finished projects, so I would love to get a debut book on its way to market one way or another!

 

What do you want to see more of in horror?

Quiet horror and scifi horror. I personally am not big on violence and gore, especially for shock value. I can never get enough of really good and original cosmic horror, especially when told from diverse voices and historically unheard perspectives. I also enjoy historic horror.

 

What other genres would you like to explore?

I write scifi and historic fantasy as well as horror, particularly cosmic horror. I’ve gotten into Weird West more – these are Westerns with a speculative twist; dark fantasy (like Stephen King’s Dark Towers series) or scifi and horror-themed. I’ve found it to be a fascinating and disturbing historic time, and one with a lot of potential to bring out more diverse voices and stories that aren’t traditionally seen in westerns.

 

Give a piece of one sentence advice for women wanting to write dark fiction.

Don’t be afraid of something that feels cliche or like a trope. Once you start to dig in you can use your unique voice and perspective to bring nuances and unexpectedness. Some of the best horror stories take something typical and turn it on its head. I also suggest to everyone to read the latest trends in science and technology – there is a lot of fodder there for dark stories.

 

Please provide a short bio. Thanks!

KC Grifant is a New England-to-SoCal transplant who writes internationally published horror, fantasy, science fiction and weird western stories for collectible card games, podcasts, anthologies and magazines. Her writings have appeared in Andromeda Spaceways Magazine, Aurealis Magazine, Unnerving Magazine, Frozen Wavelets, Tales to Terrify and Colp Magazine. Her short stories have haunted dozens of collections, including We Shall Be Monsters; Shadowy Natures: Tales of Psychological Horror; Beyond the Infinite: Tales from the Outer Reaches; Six Guns Straight From Hell Volume 3; and the Stoker-nominated Fright Mare: Women Write Horror.

 

She is the co-founder of the Horror Writers Association (HWA) San Diego chapter, an organization that helps to connect writers and fans of horror literature. Outside of creative writing, she is an award-winning science writer, editor and communications professional who has written hundreds of nonfiction scientific articles and features. In her spare time, she consumes too much coffee and chases a wild toddler.

 

For more information, visit www.KCGrifant.com or amazon.com/author/kcgrifant.

Social: instagram.com/kcgrifant/ | @kcgrifant  | facebook.com/kcgrifant

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Lucy Rose

How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing for since I was eighteen. Before then, I’d always been discouraged because I didn’t have the best literacy skills, but as I’ve grown into a young woman, I’ve learned that dedication and passion is a wonderful quality to have. That is something you can’t learn. I’ve always loved reading and creativity, but because I wasn’t the best at school, it didn’t seem like it was an option. I was lucky to get onto a university course which spring-boarded my love for writing, and now it’s something I’m starting to really forge a path in.

 

What have been your experiences in the horror community as a woman?

It has varied. I think the most difficult thing is trying to convince people not to underestimate me or see me as less serious, and a lot of that especially has to do with my personality. I’m not gothic to look at and I’m very bubbly and people mistake joy for naivety. It can be frustrating, but it’s never something I’d let stop me from writing horror.

 

2020 left everyone feeling pushed to their limit. How are you finding the creative process this year?

It’s been a mixed bag. My creative process is linked with my mental health, which, like everyone else, has been challenging this year. In some ways it’s been my most successful year and in others, it’s been my worst.

 

We truly believe in intention setting. What is your dream for 2021?

I want to query my novel and get my second financed film off the ground. The wheels are already in motion for this, I just have to stick to my plan and hopefully I should get there!

 

What do you want to see more of in horror?

Women written by women. There is so much representation of women in horror, it has always been this way, but since the dawn of horror, these women have always been written by men. I think back to some of the most iconic female protagonists in horror, and they were all penned by blokes. The truth is, when women write women, it is more authentic because we have lived the trauma of womanhood, so we can articulate well.

 

What other genres would you like to explore?

Gothic and literary fiction are on the cards for me next year. Hopefully something a little bit experimental.

 

Give a piece of one sentence advice for women wanting to write dark fiction.

Whatever it is you want to put down onto paper, write it. Don’t worry if people will think you are odd or strange. Just be honest and put your truth down – that is all that matters.

 

Please provide a short bio. Thanks!

Lucy Rose (INFP/T) is a prose writer and an award-winning writer/director. She is a charity shop addict and can be found drinking copious amounts of tea. Her most recent film, ‘She Lives Alone’, is currently visiting festivals, a number of which are BAFTA & Oscar-qualifying.

Lucy also has a BA (Hons) in Film Production and is currently studying a Masters Degree in creative writing.

Words for Boshemia, SINK Magazine, Eerie River, The Selkie, Analogies & Allegories, DBB, Kandisha Press and more. Lucy is proudly LGBTQ+ & Working Class.

@LucyRoseCreates

Lydia Prime

How long have you been writing?

I have been writing for most of my life, it seems. Inside the public eye, however, I'd say it's a bit over 4 years.

 

What have been your experiences in the horror community as a woman?

Finding footing within the horror community as a woman seems pretty tricky. For the most part though, I've found a lot of amazing friends and people in general who just want to see successes, be it their own or those around them. As for a somewhat negative side, I suppose it would be the whole boys club issue—although—it feels like we're all breaking down that barrier.

 

2020 left everyone feeling pushed to their limit. How are you finding the creative process this year?

Truthfully, 2020 gave me opportunities I wouldn't have ever had the world not imploded. I think my creative process has somewhat improved since we all started hangin' out at home. I'm a typical introvert and deal with a fair few disorders, so not having to be on edge or preform (or even work at this point) has freed me up to find more of my voice.

 

We truly believe in intention setting. What is your dream for 2021?

Dreams for 2021, eh? I've existed for almost 30 years and I've never successfully stuck to a new year's goal… that being said, I suppose my dream would be to push further, writer better, and panic less. These feel somewhat feasible to achieve haha!

 

What do you want to see more of in horror?

I'd like to see more psychological/mind bending/messes with you for a few weeks, sorts of things. I am incredibly jaded and when I want a good scare, it's sadly hard to come by. If you've ever wondered whether or not something was real/actually happening—I imagine we'd enjoy the same works.

 

What other genres would you like to explore?

If I was going to explore other genres, I don't think I'd stray too far off the path. I'd happily deep dive into unsolved mysteries, true crime, and maybe some dark/weird history. There's always a comedic under tone that I carry with me, so perhaps some kind of morbid humor type genre?

 

Give a piece of one sentence advice for women wanting to write dark fiction.

The women coming into writing dark fiction should know that other women(or authors in general) are not their enemies and that molds were meant to be broken.

 

Please provide a short bio. Thanks!

 

Lydia is that friendly monster under your bed waiting for you to stick a limb out from beneath the covers. When she’s not trying to shred scraps of humanity from the unsuspecting, she writes [comedically] bad advice columns as well as stories and poems of the horror and dark fiction variety.

Marsheila Rockwell

How long have you been writing?

 

A: The first story I remember writing was a 20-page Conan pastiche in 6th grade, complete with a reluctant warrior, a princess in need of rescue, and a talking cat. I knew as I was writing it that I had found my true calling (whatever else my day job might wind up being), and my fate was sealed.

 

What have been your experiences in the horror community as a woman?

 

A: I actually haven’t been part of the horror community per se for all that long (despite having written horror shorts & poems for years, and co-writing a SF/H/Thriller novel about psychos vs zombies with my husband, Jeff Mariotte, a few years ago). Most of my novel-length work has been dark fantasy, and I didn’t join HWA until 2020, so I’m just now starting to broaden my network in the genre. So far everyone seems very welcoming.

 

2020 left everyone feeling pushed to their limit. How are you finding the creative process this year?

 

A: It’s been like pulling teeth with electrified pliers. I was in a car accident in 2019 that left me disabled, so writing is physically impossible for me a lot of the time. Trying to work through the pain and associated trauma hasn’t left me with a lot of spoons for creativity, but I did take an on-line Witch Lit class, which sparked a few poems (two of which have been published as of this writing) and one flash piece. I also managed to write a couple of other short stories that are currently seeking homes. I also queried a novel, but that hasn’t really gone anywhere, so I’m trying to resuscitate an older manuscript with some new ideas. If we’re talking word count, that probably amounted to less than 10K for the entire year, so, yeah. Pulling teeth.  

 

We truly believe in intention setting. What is your dream for 2021?

 

A: I would love to land an agent, sell work to some more prestigious markets, and finish the above-mentioned novel.

 

What do you want to see more of in horror?

 

A: Witches! Both as the heroes AND the villains. Modern-day ones, who check moon phases and planetary hours on www.Lunarium, get their oils and herbs in bulk from Amazon, rock chunky gemstone necklaces at PTO meetings, and cast spells to facilitate corporate takeovers. The Craft girls, but all grown up.

 

What other genres would you like to explore?

 

A: I’d love to be able to capture the voice for contemporary YA, but every time I try, the results are cringy (as my teen and tween would say). As is the fact that I still use the word “cringy.”

 

Give a piece of one sentence advice for women wanting to write dark fiction.

 

A: You can’t explore your dark places and care about what other people are going to think of you – you have to pick one or the other.

 

Please provide a short bio. Thanks!

 

Multiple Scribe and Rhysling Award nominee Marsheila (Marcy) Rockwell is the author of twelve books to date. Her work includes 7 SYKOS, a near future SF/H thriller co-written with writing partner/husband Jeff Mariotte; The Shard Axe series, the only official novels that tie into the popular fantasy MMORPG, Dungeons & Dragons Online; two collections; dozens of short stories and poems; multiple articles on writing and the writing process; and a handful of comic book scripts. She is also a disabled pediatric cancer and mental health awareness advocate, and a reconnecting Chippewa/Métis. She resides in the Valley of the Sun, where she writes dark fiction and poetry in a home she and her family have dubbed ‘Redwall.’ Find out more here: http://www.marsheilarockwell.com/ or follow her on Twitter at @MarcyRockwell.

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